Hip-Hop Summertime Learning

get-attachment.aspxby Timothy Jones @tdj6899, Chief Visionary Officer #HipHopEd

The summer is a great time to engage in learning as a life style because you do not have to be concerned with a test at the end of the summer to quantify your knowledge gained unless you are attending summer school. #HipHopEd would like to propose some ideas that will provide opportunities to teach and learn throughout the summer for the educator, parent and student. The following are some projects and activities that have Hip-Hop music, culture and or pedagogy at its core but are simple to implement:
1. Summer Breeze: Create an Instagram account and challenge yourself to take a picture a day and select a song that the picture represents. You can write in the text of a lyric from a song that you feel the picture represents. You should also include the name of the song and the artist so that those who are participating with you in the project can look up the songs and possibly add their own lyrics as a comment to your post. If you are advanced you can create 15 second videos that include your still photo with the sample of the music playing. (Critical Thinking, Creativity and Communication)
2. Folders & Crates: This activity is targeted to parents and children but can also be done with teachers/educators who may be working with a small group of students during the summer.

emotionwheelThe emotion wheel above can be used as a leader in you and your child and or student identifying songs or can be used to evaluate the songs that each of you bring to the session. You can use this wheel to begin to have discussions around what are some of the characteristics that songs have that touch on these emotions. Are there songs that touch on multiple emotions and or songs that evoke one emotion to one listener and a different one to another? The concept of crates and folders is to strive for the older individual to bring in music from when they were around the age of the child and or students they are working with (crate) and the child or student would bring music that they currently have in the folders of their “i-pod” or other music device. (Critical Thinking and Collaboration)
3. You Must Learn: This is primarily for educators but a parent can do this as well on a small scale. Ask your students and or child to give the names of their top three artists. You can ask the student and or child to briefly explain why these individuals are their favorite artists and ask them to include either their favorite album or songs. You will create a playlist that you will listen to over the summer to gain some insights into how your students and or children view themselves and the world around them based on the music they consume. As you listen to the playlist you are not making judgments on the songs based on whether they fit you musical taste buds; you are listening to later present insightful revelations gained and or thought provoking questions to ask the students and or children about the song. If you are not able to get a list from students you can go to billboard and or i-tunes and create a playlist based on their top artist, or look up the playlist of your local urban radio station www.urbaninsite.com. (Critical Thinking and Communication)              4. Step into the Arena: This is an activity that students, parents and educators can do together or individually. Try your hand at one of the Hip-Hop arts over the summer. You can get a sketch pad and some sharpie markers and try to make some graffiti art. Think of a pseudonym that best describes you and develop it over the summer through various Hip-Hop arts. You can try to write and recite rhymes about your favorite activities that you plan on doing throughout the summer. If music is your thing, challenge yourself to become a DJ by looking into resources such as www.virtualdj.com. If you are game to try Hip-Hop dance, you may be able to find a local recreation center or workout facility that offers Hip-Hop dance. (Creativity, Collaboration, Communication and Critical Thinking)
5. #POP Power Of Perspective: This is primarily for educators and students, parents can challenge themselves to do this and reflect on the impact that Hip-Hop may have had on their upbringing as well as seeing the possibilities. As an Educator or Parent can you see the ability of a MC to move the crowd and engage a young person as something that you would like the ability to do?   What aspects of the MCs presentation, preparation and delivery do you see feasible to incorporate into your presentation, preparation and delivery of lessons and information that you present to your students or children? This is the power of perspective where one person can see the teachable moments that exist within the expressions of Hip-Hop where others can’t see them or choose not to acknowledge them. Here are some videos that posses some incredible wordplay as well as powerful visuals and references of education, school culture and setting. Review these videos and see if you are willing to take on the “Hip-Hop Wordsmith Alliteration” challenge. Here are four videos to get you inspired:

Papoose Alphabetical Slaughter A-Z: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SApmSrHDhQo&list=PLP47NQEbZOS0ZsVsn2pnpFmqqGMc4T9uN&feature=share&index=5

Papoose Alphabetical Slaughter Part 2 (Z-A) pay attention to school setting within the video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fM5k0CXfueQ&list=PLP47NQEbZOS0ZsVsn2pnpFmqqGMc4T9uN&feature=share&index=4

Masta Ace / Ed OG A’s & E’s:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RVgBjb9V5Ak&feature=share&list=PLP47NQEbZOS0ZsVsn2pnpFmqqGMc4T9uN&index=3

Smoothe The Hustler “The Art of Rap” Count the MCs:
http://youtu.be/gDqt0wmc-sQ

Check me out on twitter @tdj6899 and on #HipHopEd, every Tuesday from 9-10 pm EST

Peace

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#HipHopEd Poetics

By Timothy Jones, #HipHopEd

My rhymin’ is a vitamin held without a capsule

The smooth criminal on beat breaks

Never put me in your box if your s*^! eats tapes

The city never sleeps, full of villains and creeps

That’s where I learned to do my hustle, had to scuffle with freaks

– Nas, NY State of Mind

  nas&mikeAs I was traveling across the country today and thinking about our #HipHopEd chat in celebration of National Poetry Month my mind was on Nas. I have been thinking about Nas a lot and myself as we commemorate the 20th anniversary of “Illmatic.” I look at the progression of Nas as a man from “Illmatic” to “Life is Good” in some ways similar to my development as a young man being shaped by Hip-Hop to becoming an older man who is also committed to also shaping Hip-Hop. I thought about the above lines from “NY State of Mind” as a quick example of Hip-Hop’s poetic value and like great poetry is open to interpretation beyond the identification of the figurative language present in the lyrics.

A #HipHopEd Analysis:

Nas is a continuum in the legacy of impactful Black Poets that have used words to paint the artistry that is our existence in the inner cities and beyond. Think about the first line where Nas uses metaphor to substantiate his rhymes as vitamins without the capsule. The capsule on vitamins masks the often nasty taste and makes the administering of the vitamin easier. Nas is stating that his rhymes are just as beneficial as vitamins but not as easy to take and digest. The year is 1994 and Michael Jackson is cemented as the King of Pop with worldwide appeal. It is typical for new Hip-Hop artists to take shots and or draw comparisons to whoever is looked upon as the being at the top of the rap game. Nas takes to a whole different level by equating his ability to lyrically dance on beat breaks to that of Michael Jackson. Nas was crafty in selecting “Smooth Criminal” as the comparison because in this song, Michael Jackson is dressed like a Gangsta and is even holding a gun. Nas showed the ability to equate himself to Michael Jackson in a line the screams out street credibility.

The next two lines are great examples of personification where Nas mentions a radio eating and the city of New York never sleeping. For those who are old enough to remember cassettes where the tape could get caught within the radio and get tangled and destroyed. New York City has historically been called the city that never sleeps because there is always something to do in the city. Nas took this metaphor that was initially attached to a statement of the pace and life style of the better parts of the city and explained what happens in the hoods within the city because the hoods don’t sleep either. You can also take the smooth criminal reference Nas made as a qualifier of a level of association and distinction from the villains and freaks that he interacted with while growing up in Queens, NY.

This is just a quick example of what you can have students do with a knowledge of figurative language and their inherent knowledge of their coded language and culture coming together to critically examine lyrics. As your students master this process with lyrics that they select and are familiar with you can transition and challenge them with poetry and creative works within any school’s curriculum and watch your student’s critical thinking skills come alive.

Nas’ “illmatic”: Lessons in Reflections Curriculum Sample

nasXX

By Timothy Jones, Chief Visionary Officer, #HipHopEd

Overview
As a 20 year old Nasir Jones wrote and recorded on of the most renowned albums in the 40 years of contemporary Hip-Hop history. “Illmatic” is an album that can be viewed as a coming of age narrative where Nas speaks from being 10 years old on “Halftime” by saying, “Back in 83 I was an MC sparking..” to a 20 year old young adult on “Life’s a B&^%h” by saying, “ I woke early on my born day, I’m twenty..” The album cover features Nas at 7 years graphically imposed with the ghetto behind him but you can see the ghetto scene through the picture as well. This duality of the image of the ghetto being visible behind and through a young Nas symbolizes the power of the influence that the environments and neighborhoods are having on children as they grow. The ability of Nas to articulate his story with a combination of accepting and challenging his reality is a skill that fosters a resilience that all young people need to develop.

“The Lessons in Reflections” is a curriculum designed to invite youth in middle school to look at the narrative of “Illmatic” through select quotes from 8 of the 10 songs on the album. The songs “One Love” and “Represent” do not have selected quotes but the titles of these songs will be used to develop activities for the youth. These quotes were selected on the ability to use the words to challenge young people to better understand where Nas was coming from and for them to view their own neighborhoods to assess the influence that their environments can have on their development. The reflection process is one where the youth will look at themselves as individuals and as members of their communities. The youth will begin to evaluate what aspects of their environment are obstacles versus opportunities based on how they see themselves and how they want their lives to play out in the future.

The content of “Illmatic” is graphic and discusses themes such as drug use, women and violence and sex in a manner that is not appropriate for a classroom or after school setting to be played in its entirety. This is another reason why the quotes were selected because the over arching theme of evaluating oneself as they develop within a given environment is a lesson that young people must learn and understand as they transition through the various stages of development as a child and an adolescent. The focus of the curriculum will be targeted at helping young people navigate through the “Industry (competence) vs. Inferiority” stage according to Erikson’s Psychosocial Stages. This stage is where the young people begin to have their world expanded and the influence of seeking the acceptance of their peers grows in importance. This stage also introduces young people to their environments in a way that requires them to determine their place within their environment as they begin to spend more time away from home.

On the next series of pages is an outline of the selected quotes and suggested guided questions for the rap sessions and activities that will be designed to engage middle school/high school youth through Nas’ “Illmatic”: Lessons in Reflections.

Nas “Illmatic” Quotes (Grades 6th-12th)

1. The Genesis
True indeed, knamsayin’, but when it’s real you doin’ this
Even without a record contract, knamsayin‘”

What are some things that you like to do that could possibly lead to careers? Is the purpose that you are doing these activities for money, careers or for the love and how it makes you feel?

2. NY State of Mind
“I never sleep, cause sleep is the cousin of death
Beyond the walls of intelligence, life is defined
I think of crime when I’m in a New York state of mind”

We know that natural sleep is an important bodily function. Sleep in this sense means to move without thinking or to not pay attention. The reference of sleep being a cousin of death is showing the relation that sleeping in the slang sense can have with death. We can also look at sleep as wasting time and how wasting time and behaving in certain ways can mean the death of our dreams. Create a handout that allows the students to create a list of statements where the complete the following: I sleep when I _____ instead of doing ______. Have at least five of these statements with possible different fonts.

Beyond the walls of intelligence life is defined means that there is always more that we can learn because our intelligence is limited to what we have learned and life is so much more. This is a call for all of us to become lifelong learners because it takes a life time to learn about life. This quote can challenge you to look at the world through a balance of your imagination and your intellect. What do you see with your imagination that you can use your intellect to make a reality? How do you increase your intellect? How do you increase your imagination? How can you define life? Create a handout with two pair of glasses. One labeled “Intellect” and the other “Imagination.” Students will list how their lives are defined by each and then on the bottom of their list they will make some observations as to how the definitions of life can become one in the same as they increase their intellect and foster their imagination. (I&I)

What do you think about when you think about Washington DC? What is the DC state of mind from your view? Use a storyboard handout with three squares and lines on the side of each square. The students will draw a scene and explain what is taking place on the side of each scene. (You can substitute Washington DC with your home town)

“Life is parallel to hell but I must maintain”

Parallel can mean equal to or similar to but parallel in math means: “Lines are parallel if they lie in the same plane, and are the same distance apart over their entire length” This definition means that no matter how bad life may be it never touches what we view as hell or eternal destruction. This mindset or point of view can help us maintain. What are some of the things that you see in your life or the lives of people that you know that you believe are bad? How do you maintain (continue) to have a positive outlook on life in spite of the negatives you see in life? Create a landscape handout where the word “Life” is written down both sides of the margin. Then have a set of parallel lines either running diagonal or through the center. One part of the handout will be representations of decisions that can result in lost freedoms and opportunities in life. The other side will be representations of decisions that result in obtaining freedoms and opportunities in life.

*This is a sample set of activities for these two songs.  If you are interested in partnering in the development and or implementation of this curriculum please contact Timothy Jones tdj6899@gmail.com

 

The Use and Abuse of Words, Culture and History

Nicki-Minaj-Lookin-X-300x300by Timothy Jones

We exist in a cycle where it can be perceived that men go to extreme lengths to garner respect and admiration from other men but part of the often twisted measurement of manhood is based on the respect and admiration we receive from women.  Even though as men we may do so many things together, at the end of the day it is what women think of us that goes a long way in validating our sense of self esteem and self worth to ourselves when we look in the mirror.  As men we control so many of the images and messages that are sent to women about what constitutes being a real man.  As men it is one level of pressure to rise above the narrow and often dysfunctional portrayals of what makes a man a man that is presented by men, but when this narrow and dysfunctional portrayal is embraced and presented by women it makes this cycle even more dangerous because in the end we as men want the respect and admiration of women.

Nicki Minaj released a song on February 12th called “Lookin A$$ Nigga” (http://youtu.be/vEZ-e6tBigY). In this song Nicki is identifying the men who can only look from the sidelines during the game of life because they are lacking what is necessary to play in the game.  This includes what it would take to get with Nicki Minaj sexually which is the ultimate determining factor in measuring real niggas versus looking a$$ niggas in the minds of men.  Mobb Deep made the Hip-Hop classic “Shook Ones” http://youtu.be/yoYZf-lBF_U where the hook states “You shook ain’t no such thing as half way crooks, scared to death scared to look, you shook.”  “Shook Ones” can be looked at as a song that also presents paradigms of manhood that is accepted and respected in hood and those that aren’t.  One difference is that in ‘Shook Ones” the measurements of manhood doesn’t include the admiration and respect of women as a qualifier.

Another interesting aspect to “Lookin A$$ Nigga” is the shift in the tone of how Nicki Minaj is classifying and addressing men as Niggas from her song “N.I.G.G.A.S” http://youtu.be/DHtu7ghUCVY  In N.I.G.G.A.S Nicki Minaj is shouting out attributes of men that she admires and even included Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X by desiring to have the chance to thank them for what they started.  The songs are not only linked by the fact that the same artist made both of them, they have the N word in the title, but through Malcolm X.  In “N.I.G.G.A.S” Malcolm X is mentioned with a desire to thank him for what he started.  In “Lookin A$$ Nigga” there is an image of Malcolm holding a rifle looking out the window that was released as possible cover art.

There are several conversations that can and should be had based on an analysis of Nicki Minaj’s latest song:

1.       The impact of perceptions of the hierarchy of manhood amongst men and women

2.       The pattern of dysfunctional relationships that often result from women getting together with the types of men that are described in “Lookin A$$ Nigga” as being the real men or according to the song “niggas.”  You can begin this discussion with Destiny Child’s song “Soldier” http://youtu.be/qFJ3VKnwmJw

3.       Our responsibility to properly preserve and acknowledge our history and elders and how the way we treat our history impacts how others outside our race treat our history and icons.

4.       How the narrative of young adults and adults about manhood can validate and promote the narratives that are coming from our youth about manhood. 

5.       A gender based discussion questioning whether the perceived characteristics of beauty and power possessed by Nicki Minaj makes her narrative more accepted and embraced.

For more insightful discussions involving the intersections of Hip-Hop, Culture, Education and Youth check of #HipHopEd on Twitter every Tuesday from 9-10 pm.  Tweet and or search using the hash tag #HipHopEd to participate in the weekly chats.  Follow me on twitter at @tdj6899

Hip-Hop Project Based Learning: Illmatic

nas_illmatic_pv

By Timothy Jones @tdj6899 for #HipHopEd

Imagine in the fall semester of 1992 a group of students are taking a sociology class at a local college in New York City.  The students are having a series of discussions about the impact that project living and drugs can have on behavior and one’s outlook on life.  The Sociology course covered several theories and began with a comparison and contrasting of the sociological and social theories.  The Sociological theory is often based on testable propositions about society and relies on the scientific method in its aim for objectivity.  The Social theory is less concerned with objectivity and more likely to pass normative judgments.  The professor challenged the students to form groups and produce a project that embodies a sociological or social theory approach to answering the following driving question:

What are some of the impacts on children growing up in an inner city that is plagued by the environments of drugs, perceived lack of opportunity and violence that urban educators need to understand?  The students through their project would be providing urban educators various insights into some of the behaviors and perspectives that these young people in their classrooms may have.  The urban educators should be able to use the lessons within the finished project to better understand and engage the youth in their classrooms that are growing up in different urban neighborhoods in New York City and beyond.

A group of students named Nas, Q-Tip, Large Professor, DJ Premiere, L.E.S., Pete Rock and AZ decided to examine their upbringings in Queens and Brooklyn using a social theory approach and write and produce a series of songs that would later be packaged and released in 1994 as Nas’ debut album “Illmatic.”  Here is a closer examination of how “Illmatic” could have been the result of a project based learning assignment given in a sociology class back in the fall semester of 1992.  Buck Institute for Education www.bie.org is a premiere resource for project based learning and they have created an essential checklist for educators to understand the elements that must be present in project based learning.

Looking back, here is how “Illmatic” could have been evaluated based on having the essential elements of project based learning:

1.       Focus on significant content: “Illmatic” is the coming of age story of a young man growing up in New York City during the height of the crack epidemic which ravaged many inner cities across America

2.       Develop 21st Century Competencies: The creation of “Illmatic” featured the collaboration of Nas and a collection of the premiere Hip-Hop producers of the day.  The album communicated a story that spanned an array of emotions in a manner that was deemed acceptable (where often the only acceptable emotion to express is anger) by individuals growing up under the strictest of definition of manhood.  Nas and AZ exhibits creativity and critical thinking as MCs with crafted rhymes that tell stories, embodied figurative language and elevated rhyming standards for MCs that followed for more than a decade.

3.       Engage students in in-depth inquiry: The group held extensive conversations about life growing up in the ghetto and how they felt society at large viewed black and brown youth from the ghetto.  The group consisted of individuals that were experts in their craft who was given the task of cultivating the budding genius that was in the writings of Nasir Jones.

4.       Organize tasks around a driving question: The tasks were designated based on their talents and their ability to contribute their experiences to the following driving question:   What are some of the impacts on children growing up in an inner city that is plagued by the environments of drugs, perceived lack of opportunity and violence that urban educators need to understand?

5.       Establish a need to know: The media’s portrayal of black and brown youth from the inner city during this time frame was very stereotypically and selectively driven; it was critical that a group of young people begin to give firsthand accounts to better inform urban educators who were allowing the media’s portrayal of inner city youth to begin to influence how they engaged these youth in the classroom.

6.        Encourage voice and choice: The students were given the freedom to tell their story in a manner that resonated with themselves and their peers.  The students chose to speak through Hip-Hop and challenged the urban educators to learn on their terms as opposed to writing a standard report or story.

7.       Incorporate revision and reflection: MC Serch served as the Executive Producer of “Illmatic” and was in charge of reviewing the songs with the Artists and Producers to ensure that the best final product possible was put out to the masses.

8.       Include a public audience: The finished album was released on April 19, 1994 after singles were released and one song featured on a movie soundtrack.  The project received the coveted 5 microphone evaluation from The Source magazine, which at the time was the premiere source of Hip-Hop journalism.

For more insights as to how Hip-Hop can be used as a tool for effective Project Based Learning check out the following video http://bie.org/object/video/keep_it_real and join our weekly #HipHopEd chat every Tuesday from 9-10 pm EST.

“I never sleep, cause sleep is the cousin of death. Beyond the walls of intelligence (schools) life is defined “- Nas, New York State of Mind

Civil Rights Education via A Beat & A Rhyme

TakeMe2YourLeaderDownload Mix Tape Here:   http://t.co/0PU4tGDJzo

By Timothy Jones, Chief Visionary Officer #HipHopEd @tdj6899

I’m sitting at my computer with my headphones on listening to “Take Me To Your Leader” created by DJ Hoodwink provided by @raptjr as my personal way to reflect on the day that the nation celebrates and commemorates the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.  This is not a standard mix tape review where I say this song is hot and this artist is featured.  This is a mix tape overview where I expound on the intent of the mix tape and the hope that the listener gets the responsibility that comes within the re-creation of the project. 

To drop “Take Me To Your Leader” on #MLKDAY14 would naturally make you believe that the leader that we are being taken to is Dr. King and what he represented for us as a people.  But if you really listen to the music and focus on the power of Hip-Hop as a medium that is now a worldwide phenomenon; the leader(s) are the voices of the artists on the project.  Leadership is something that can no longer be embodied in an individual that can be assassinated in an attempt to stop whatever movement the individual represented.  Leadership is a shared responsibility that we do not have the luxury of deciding whether to embrace without severe consequences for our failure to act.  There are roles within the notion of leadership that position some as leaders, but not in the traditional sense that led to the assassinations of Malcolm and Martin amongst others.

Leadership is the theory by which we embrace our connectivity to one another as people who are aligned by our experiences which include our victories, sacrifices and our sufferings.  Music and art has always been one of our most powerful weapons in evoking collective thought that incite a people to the point that they see themselves and the world around them through the paradigms created by the music.  Art is a continual remix of sounds, thoughts and method of expression; which inherently attaches a responsibility to all who dare call themselves artists.  This ideology is not prevalent in our commercialized Hip-Hop that dominates American airwaves, but is bubbling in what we call the “Underground.”  Is it a coincidence that the “Underground Railroad” is the name of the system that was developed to transport individuals from enslaved to free?  Can the music on “Take Me To Your Leader” be a stop on the “Underground Railroad” of Hip-Hop music that can transport the mentality of our youth and adults from enslaved to free?  A mindset that is free to question the way things are and presenting an alternative narrative that explains the way things can and should be?

5 Ways to use “Take Me To Your Leader” as way to introduce civil rights education to youth and adults

1. Listen to Mix Tape with a group of young people and conduct searches for the subject matters that are in the songs.  An example would be listening to “Dear Chicago Summer” and examine how violence increases in the summer and discuss ways that this pattern can be changed for summer 2014.

2. There are portions of tracks where you hear words from President Obama’s tribute to Nelson Mandela laid over Hip-Hop beats.  Take some of the words of Dr. King that speak to the realities that many people are still dealing with and have them remix the words by putting them to music.  Here is a Dr. King snippet that is seldom presented in schools, Dr. King said it: “I’m Black and I’m Proud”

3. Track 28 “Wake Up Everybody” on the Mix Tape is a remake of “Wake Up Everybody” by Teddy Pendergrass, Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes in 1975.  This creative expression is a great time travel bridge to begin to look at music from the past that called for us as a community to go higher and the Hip-Hop that is doing the same thing today.

4. Track 10 Jasiri X’s “21 Forever” provides the backdrop to look at the portrayal of young adulthood that is presented in commercial Hip-Hop and compare it to the role that young people played in the civil rights movement.  Teach our young people what the Freedom Riders were doing as 21 year olds.

5. Track 29 Dee-1 “Walking Revolution” provides a list of rules embodied by Dee-1 and the movement behind his music.  Look up some of the rules or creeds developed by organizations that were involved with civil rights.  Have the students develop their own set of rules that they must agree upon as a class for a movement to empower themselves.  Also check out Dee-1’s “American Dream” and discuss the feasibility of achieving an “American Dream” from an “Inner City Nightmare”

“A man without a mission is in mental prison, no bail”- Dee-1

The Creation of the #HipHopEd Top 40 Songs based on Educational Value #T40S

By Timothy Jones, Chief Visionary Officer #HipHopEd @tdj6899
Slide1
In commemoration of the 40th anniversary of the party in the recreation room at 1520 Sedgwick Avenue in the Bronx, New York on August 11, 1973 hosted by DJ Kool Herc, we decided to curate a top 40 list. Many people view this as the beginning of contemporary Hip-Hop although the phrase (Hip-Hop) wasn’t used to capture the elements of the budding culture until Afrika Bambaataa in 1974. We didn’t want to curate a typical top 40 list based on sales or the pontificating that has become customary when individuals create lists of the top MCs in the game at a moment or in history. We decided that we would create an objective approach to curate a subjective list of the top 40 songs in the history of Hip-Hop based on educational value. There was a clear distinction between educational value and educational content. The determination of educational value was determined more by the ability of the educator as well as the content of the song. To determine educational content would have required a set of educational standards to serve as the benchmark of the content and this probably would have garnered a very short list.

The plan was to have the chat on Tuesday July 30, 2013 serve as the opportunity for the #HipHopEd community to present songs that they believed should be on the list. The time period where we would count suggestions was from 9:00 pm EST on Tuesday July 30, 2013 until 9:00 am EST on Wednesday July 31, 2013. The weekly #HipHopEd chats only last an hour but we have a growing group of Hip-Hop Educators in the United Kingdom who are fours ahead of our time zone, and we wanted to give them a chance to participate without having to stay up in the middle of the night. The tweets that we counted included the hash tags #HipHopEd and #T40S (Top 40 Songs). We would capture the full 12 hours of tweets and count each song that was mentioned. Once a song was tweeted we also counted the amount of times the tweet was retweeted (RT) and or made a favorite (FAV). If there were two songs that had the same number of total votes the order they would be placed on the list was at the discretion of the leadership team of #HipHopEd. The chat scheduled for Tuesday August 6, 2013 would be where the top songs would be revealed in groups of 10 and in 15 minute intervals. The 15 minute intervals will provide a window for each list of 10 songs to be discussed and or debated.

The chat that took place on July 30th was amazing because the participation level was so high that we trended on Twitter well beyond the regular length of our chat which is an hour. The participants were of various ages from teenagers to individuals in their 40s and beyond. The participants were educators, students, artists and fans. The subjective determination of “educational value” was presented in ways that to some were easily accepted and in other instances, not so much based on the lack of RTs and FAVs. The chat was captured on Chirpstory http://chirpstory.com/li/103442. Chipstory is a website that allows you to search tweets using a particular hash tag and then gather them so they flow like a story. Once the Chirpstory is complete the link can be shared and viewed by anyone in our #HipHopEd community and beyond. The Chirpstory also serves as a great reference tool which allows us to go back and review past chats and assess the impact of the chat based on the times the story has been viewed.

During week between July 30th and August 6th we sifted through all the data that we collected and we put together the top 40 song list. We had to make an executive decision on song number 40 because there were 3 songs remaining with the same number of votes for the final slot. Outside of this executive decision the list shaped out to clearly represent the songs that were tweeted with accompanying RTs and or FAVs during the voting period. The songs on the list represented a wide spectrum of Hip-Hop based on the years that the songs were released. Ten percent (4 songs) that made the top 40 came from artists that were independent and Fifteen percent (6 songs) came from the ladies and another song featured a lady on the chorus. The educational value of the songs ranged from the song’s significance in the history of Hip-Hop, the subject matter addressed in the song and the structure of the song.

The true educational value of the #T40S will be measured on what educators and individuals do with the list. This chart is being used around the country as a tool to ask critical questions of youth and adults using the lens that Hip-Hop provides to discuss the issues of life that often times we find difficult to discuss. This chart is full of introspect, anger, warnings and challenges for us as a community. Here are the links to the four lists that were released during the #HipHopEd chat on Tuesday August 6, 2013.
8-6-13_Draft_3
1. Songs 40-31: http://edcvs.co/13BUruH
2. Songs 30-21: http://edcvs.co/13BUAhI
3. Songs 20-11: http://edcvs.co/13BUIhb
4. Songs 10-1: http://edcvs.co/13BULcN

To review past #HipHopEd chats please go to http://www.chirpstory/id/amilcook.com